Forums (I/O Tower)
Forums 
  General Discussion 
 Was Dillinger all THAT bad?


New New Comments | Post No Change | Locked Closed
AuthorComments: FirstPrevious Page: of 3 Pages
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
No Title

on Monday, February, 10, 2003 5:50 PM
That may sound strict, but heck, ANY homeowners associated subdivision is about the same. I live in a very typical one and got a notification to not leave my waterhose in view in my front yard. It sucks to be told what to do in your own house, but it sure beats worrying that your neighbors could flip out an ruin the entire block with a Cadillac Stonehenge in their front yard next to yours.

The bad thing is obeying the rules, but the good thing is your neighbors have to too. Just be sure you agree with them before you buy.

But, I don't see how Disney could have controlled any residential codes around it. But, can't feel too sorry for the one's under it's domain. They had a choice before they bought too. And you can't feel too sorry for anyone that actually lived there first (if there was anyone) because if they decided to sell and move away because of the new rules making them mad they sure got the nice perk of their property value shooting up 450% from being a "Disney homeowner's associated district."

There is most definately two sides to that coin. It ain't all a bad thing like they'd want to make it out to be and be felt sorry for.

"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
Hale-XF11
User

Posts: 484
No Title

on Monday, February, 10, 2003 7:16 PM
Sketch,
You bet they have strict rules!
It's called "The Disney Look."
You hair must always be cut above the ears and perfectly even on all sides. They even give you a handbook with pictures of 3 different male hairstyles that you are allowed to have (dating back to 1967). Also, NO visible tattoos, NO piercings and NO facial hair whatsoever. I thought for a second I was being recruited for Military Academy but even THEY aren't that strict.
You also have to walk, talk and act in a very specific way at all times but I won't get into detail but I will say that it's hard not to screw up at least one rule on any given day.
I tried it their way (didn't wanna get my butt kicked by Mickey) but it didn't really fly with me. I didn't feel like a normal human being or even an individual at all.
I wasn't me then, but I'm me now

heh, I guess this topic has turned into:
"Was DISNEY all THAT bad?"



-------------------------------------+megalith music+-------------------------------------
 
sondlar
User

Posts: 61
Disney

on Monday, February, 10, 2003 9:48 PM
I remember watching spme show about the hidden stuff in all the theme parks and a part about how the Magic Kingdom has a whole underground levelwhere all the employees go, kind of cool if ya ask me. I also read where theres some secret place also in the Magic Kingdom where important people (celebrities,etc) can go and hang out. I think it was like a bar with pool and stuff heh but its been a while.

Waiting for

 
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
No Title

on Monday, February, 10, 2003 10:28 PM
Well Hale-XF11, I tell you what. When I take MY daughter when she's going to be about 5 to 7 years old to Disneyland and shell out no less than about 5,000.00 bucks for the experience then the last thing I'm gonna want to see is a shabby, shiftless punko with a nose ring and a purple mohawk mumbling "welcome to dizneyland dude."

Like I said before, there's always two sides to every coin... especially when the coin comes from a customer with expectations.

"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
Sketch
Sector Admin

Posts: 2,934
No Title

on Monday, February, 10, 2003 11:43 PM
Ha ha ha! That would be the dress code for Ghetto Disney Land.



 
TriggerEXE
User

Posts: 339
*Shivers*

on Tuesday, February, 11, 2003 9:01 AM
Yeah, I've heard of the Disney neighborhoods. I have relatives that live in Florida, and one accidentally ended up driving around in there. She said it was CREEPY! Everything is all perfect and really quiet. She said she saw some lady walking her dog there and stopped to ask how to get back to the main highway. The lady just smiled all plastic and fake like and didn't give her an answer. *shivers* Places like that give me the creeps. Moreso than playing games like Resident Evil and Silent Hill. You wanna see something REALLY scary? Just drive up into one of those places at night. Next time in Florida, I'm going to force my cousin to take me there so I can see for myself. There are some strange, strange things in this world to be sure. O_o...

"The dark can embrace the light, but never eclipse it."
 
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
No Title

on Tuesday, February, 11, 2003 11:06 AM
Oh well, not excluding myself from off-trackin' , let's get back to Dillinger.



"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Saturday, February, 22, 2003 8:06 PM
You know, it was pointed out earlier in this thread that (generally to resecure Dillinger's being guilty of corporate crime) that he started on at Encom 'after' Flynn, making the defense that Dillinger couldn't have been acting in behalf of the company when appropriating Flynn's games and firing him. The information was attained in Flynn's "way back machine" speech. Well, I popped Tron in again today and noticed that this information wasn't that clear after all. Flynn was telling the story embellished with "enter Flynn" and "enter Dillinger" like a theater play, 'not neccessarily' in chronological order. There is no pure indication in that speech that he DID work there before Dillinger, just that he was described first in Flynn's verbal lecture. See what I mean?

So that sort of takes us back a few steps in that Dillinger wasn't quite all that bad.

Hm...

"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
KiaPurity
User

Posts: 3,482
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Sunday, February, 23, 2003 8:00 PM
Well, someone else could have written MCP and Dillinger could have found it and added more to it... thusly, making it unstable. Very unstable.

Sark probably came little bit later...?

Kia: Cool. I'm a infamous mythological perfect User.

 
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Sunday, February, 23, 2003 10:56 PM
You know, I always had a feeling that Dillinger wasn't the MCP's ultimate creator. Don't ask me why, but the fact that it didn't look like Warner when killed, not even an old Warner, kinda pushes it forward a bit.

Hm.

"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
Trace
User

Posts: 1,530
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Tuesday, February, 25, 2003 1:32 AM
No question there, the guy's typing on a typewriter for corns sake. For all we know the MCP started out as a punchcard!


 
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Thursday, June, 17, 2004 1:49 PM
Are these two threads concidered dead now?

Nothing left to discuss?

They're my favorites.



"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
The Tweaker
User

Posts: 0
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Friday, June, 18, 2004 1:54 PM
But what really makes me wonder, is if Dillinger wrote the MCP, then who wrote Sark?

Dillinger again? Don't think so.

No, I think it was the .



He could have stolen him. Pick up a nice security program from ARPANET, corrupt him, and presto! brand new second-in-command.


 
IsoLine
User

Posts: 1,025
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Tuesday, June, 22, 2004 2:52 AM
TheJediUnit Wrote:You know, I always had a feeling that Dillinger wasn't the MCP's ultimate creator. Don't ask me why, but the fact that it didn't look like Warner when killed, not even an old Warner, kinda pushes it forward a bit.

Hm.


You are right assuming Dillienger wasn't the original creator of the MCP. There were two hints given to that in the dialog of the film. The first is when Sark tells the MCP that a user even wrote him to which the MCP replied "No one user wrote me, I'm worth thousands of man hours." The second hint comes from the scene when Dr. Gibbs tells Dillinger how he remembers the MCP when it was just a Chess program. So we have verbal evidence that the MCP was not entirlely a Dillinger brain-child and that he was originally one of the most rudimentary AI programs created by humans: "A CHESS PROGRAM".

However we also know that he steals data (programs) from other computers through what quite possibly is the internet, and add them to his collective memory. He even has the ability to learn new languages like Chinese which is quite interesting considering Chinese computers use binary arithmetic much like any other nations computers. Perhaps he needed the Chinese language files to read Chinese text, off newspapers and such, which would also indicate he is heuristicly capable of emulating human traits on more than an practical level. He may like to emulate for aesthetic reasons.

Perhaps the MCP really wanted to be a user. Like Dillinger.

"Word to the Motherboard!" - IsoLine
 
TheJediUnit
User

Posts: 474
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Tuesday, June, 22, 2004 10:47 AM
Wasn't this long before the advent of the internet?

There had long-since been remote networking, but not an actual internet as we know it today.

"Having is not as pleasing a thing as wanting. It is not logical, but it is often true."
--Spock
 
KiaPurity
User

Posts: 3,482
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Tuesday, June, 22, 2004 3:15 PM
Internet was offical in 1983, but before that, it was arpanet...

Not to mention that C64 was created in 1982... and there were modems for it and Vic-20 (which was created in 1980)

So, I'm pretty sure, people could *use* a form of internet in the early 80's... and that it would make sense for Tron.

(Note, Flynn has some kind of modem for his Apple III. Need to look this up. The phone reciever is apparently hooked up to it...)

Kia: Cool. I'm a infamous mythological perfect User.

 
Compucore
User

Posts: 4,419
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Tuesday, June, 22, 2004 5:03 PM
Well before the internet was available to all of us here. And its true Kia-Purity. It was Arpanet before anything new came along. It was initially for a couple of universities, and several Government Agencies during the early 50's to late 60's.

Back then everything was just plain text nothing really graphical about it back then. Since the fastest modems were like 300-1200 baud modems. I believe as well at the time it was similar to what Bulletin Board systems were like in the 80-90's. I had done some research about this for one of my courses about a year ago. When I was taking computer programming over here.




KiaPurity Wrote:Internet was offical in 1983, but before that, it was arpanet...

Not to mention that C64 was created in 1982... and there were modems for it and Vic-20 (which was created in 1980)

So, I'm pretty sure, people could *use* a form of internet in the early 80's... and that it would make sense for Tron.

(Note, Flynn has some kind of modem for his Apple III. Need to look this up. The phone reciever is apparently hooked up to it...)


2 Legit 2 quit

End of line

Compucore

VROOOOOOOOOMMMM!!!

To compute or not to compute that is the question at hand. Tis nobler to compile in C++ or in TASM.


 
IsoLine
User

Posts: 1,025
Re: Was Dillinger all THAT bad?

on Sunday, June, 27, 2004 1:47 AM
Compucore Wrote:Well before the internet was available to all of us here. And its true Kia-Purity. It was Arpanet before anything new came along. It was initially for a couple of universities, and several Government Agencies during the early 50's to late 60's.

Back then everything was just plain text nothing really graphical about it back then. Since the fastest modems were like 300-1200 baud modems. I believe as well at the time it was similar to what Bulletin Board systems were like in the 80-90's. I had done some research about this for one of my courses about a year ago. When I was taking computer programming over here.




KiaPurity Wrote:Internet was offical in 1983, but before that, it was arpanet...

Not to mention that C64 was created in 1982... and there were modems for it and Vic-20 (which was created in 1980)

So, I'm pretty sure, people could *use* a form of internet in the early 80's... and that it would make sense for Tron.

(Note, Flynn has some kind of modem for his Apple III. Need to look this up. The phone reciever is apparently hooked up to it...)

Exactly right Compucore. Arpanet and Darpanet were the forerunners of the internet and were created sometime in the early to mid sixties if my memory serves me. Basically these are the backbones of the internet as we know it. Designed out of the cold war fears of nuclear war, the government and military wanted a way to commmunicate that was likely to survive if the normal communication infrastructure was destroyed.
Basically all the defense installations, important government agencies and some universities would have computers tied to these dedicated lines of communication. As more installations were built, so were more "nodes" of communication, so eventually you had a network of nodes spread not just nationwide but into allied countries. So basically there was internet back in those days but only government and miltary agencies could access it. Perhaps the priveledge was affrorded to companies that had defense or government contracts but I am not sure and the few universities that were connected were undoubtedly universities with ties to government research.
Modem communication has existed independant of the internet. Before the internet could be reached by regular phone modem, you simply called the other computer you wished to communicate with and the electronic transfer took place over phonelines at a very slow rate. There were no internet addresses, so all computers (usually) mainframes had landline connections with phone numbers to provide access. Depending on the software, the terminal you were using could display either text or some rudimentary ASCII like graphics. I remember not only using an Atari to connect to online BBS with phone numbers but my step-father would sometimes bring a portable terminal home. It was a Texas Instruments thing, kinda like a huge calculator with full QWERTY keys that had a printer instead of a screen and two cups on the back that you would place the phone reciever in (accoustic modem). He would call the mainframe at his job and create programs via the terminal using the link to the mainframe's software. It was woefully primitive, but this is what started it all.


"Word to the Motherboard!" - IsoLine
 
FirstPrevious Page: of 3 Pages
New New Comments | Post No Change | Locked Closed
Forums 
  General Discussion 
 Was Dillinger all THAT bad?
You Are Not Online

Not Logged In

Sign In or Create An Account

I/O Tower